Podiatrist in San Leandro, CA
Foot Doctor of the East Bay
1300 Bancroft Ave
San Leandro, CA 94577
(510) 483-3390
(510) 394-6402 fax
Podiatrist  in San Leandro, CA Call For Pricing Options!

Foot Doctor of the East Bay Blog Foot Doctor of the East Bay Facebook Foot Doctor of the East Bay Twitter Foot Doctor of the East Bay Google Plus Foot Doctor of the East Bay YouTube Foot Doctor of the East Bay Pinterest

Posts for: September, 2014

By Dr. Michael Stein
September 24, 2014
Category: Blisters

How to Treat BlistersBlisters can happen to anyone, even world-class athletes with the best training and equipment. At the U.S. Open tennis championships a few weeks ago, eventual runner-up Kei Nishikori had to overcome a quarter-sized blister on the ball of his foot during his quarterfinal victory over Australian Open champ Stanislas Wawrinka. Nishikori was only allowed a few minutes to tape up his injury before continuing the match. Your blister treatment probably won’t be so high-stakes, though that doesn’t make it any more pleasant.

If the blister is intact, isn’t preventing you from walking, and isn’t in too much pain, do your best to avoid breaking it. Popping it exposes you to bacteria and infection. If you can leave it uncovered or only very loosely bandaged, all the better. Adhesive bandages work best for small blisters, while a more porous and breathable material is better for larger pockets.

If it does break, wash the entire area as soon as possible with just warm water and a gentle soap—no hydrogen peroxide, iodine, or the like. Carefully pat dry, smooth down the skin flap, and apply an antibiotic ointment, then cover with a loose bandage. This will help minimize the risk of infection.

Sometimes, a blister limits movement or is too large and painful and must be drained. If this is the case for you, you’ll want to wash the area first, then use a sterilized needle to poke a small hole at the edge of the blister and carefully drain the fluid. After that, wash the affected area one more time and follow the same steps as above for a blister that breaks naturally.

Once the blister has been drained—either by choice or by accident—you need to take good care of the site until it heals. Change your bandage at least once per day, more often if it gets dirty or wet. Stay off your feet if possible, and wear extra-thick socks when you need to get around—they help cushion the force of your steps.

Hopefully your at-home blister treatment will head off any serious complications, but if you notice any problems, be sure to contact Dr. Michael Stein and Zeindelin Ahmad, DPM of Foot Doctor of the East Bay. We have three convenient locations to serve all of your foot care needs. Dial (510) 483-3390 for San Leandro, (925) 425-9684 for Pleasanton, or (408) 356-6767 for Los Gatos.

Photo Credit: Artur84 via FreeDigitalPhotos.net


By Dr. Michael Stein
September 24, 2014
Category: Footwear

Right Shoes for Heel PainWhether you’re a runner, dancer, parent, or just frequently need to walk or stand, nothing stops you in your tracks like heel pain. That’s doubly problematic if you live in our neighborhood: San Francisco and Oakland have been named among the most walkable cities in the United States. If you want to take advantage of the world-class shopping, dining, and entertainment available in the Bay Area (not to mention great hiking and recreation spots surrounding it), you need your feet in top shape. Often, that starts with finding the right shoes for heel pain.

In general, you want to be looking for comfortable, well-fitting shoes with proper arch support, plenty of cushioning, and rigid sides and soles that resist twisting and folding. For more specific tips, read on.

Let’s say your eyes happen upon the most beautiful pair of shoes you’ve ever seen. It must be meant to be! You try them on, but they don’t quite feel right. Don’t buy them! No matter how much a particular style or brand appeals to your sense of fashion, if you have to “break it in” first, it doesn’t fit, probably won’t ever fit, and could damage your feet.

High heels are murder on your feet: regular use can lead to a whole host of foot problems, from corns and bunions to ankle instability and plantar fasciitis. But if you must wear them, lower, chunkier heels (2 inches or less) and roomier toe boxes are better (or at least not as bad).

A normal arch can accommodate just about anything off the rack (lucky!), but high arches will need extra cushioning and a softer platform, while flat arches generally require some custom inserts.

Take advantage of specialized shoes for specialized activities. You’re a runner? Invest in some good running shoes. You play basketball? Look for good basketball shoes, and so on.

For more tips on selecting shoes for heel pain, keep up with our blog posts and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest. To set up an appointment with experts Dr. Michael Stein and Zeindelin Ahmad, DMP at Foot Doctor of the East Bay, stop by one of our three convenient East Bay locations, or call (510) 483-3390 for San Leandro, (925) 425-9684 for Pleasanton, or (408) 356-6767 for Los Gatos.

Photo Credit: Dabambic via Pixabay.com


Relieve Arthritic Toe PainIn the population of Great Britain approximately half a million people are affecting by arthritis of the big toe. Cartiva, a relatively new implant made of a putty-like material, may ease the pain and stiffness caused by arthritis. The cartiva implant is surgically inserted between the bones of the toe to prevent them from rubbing together. The flexible material allows it to act as a shock absorber, which is actually similar to cartilage.

The feet are particularly susceptible to arthritis, especially in the big toe. If you are suffering from painful arthritis of the foot or ankle, see podiatrist Dr. Michael Stein of Foot Doctor of the East Bay. Dr. Steinwill alleviate your joint pain and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Arthritic Foot Care

In an average lifetime, we walk approximately 75,000 miles. This can put a great deal of stress on the 26 bones and 30 joints that we have in our feet. As we get older, our feet lose flexibility and elasticity. Our shock absorbers weaken, and if arthritis comes into play, the joints become inflamed and distorted. Arthritic foot care and treatment would become imperative at this point.

It is best to take care of your feet by wearing well-fitted shoes. Certain conditions may develop when you wear shoes that don’t fit properly, for example hammertoes, neuroma, and bunions. Wearing shoes that have a lower heel and extra room in the shoe can help your feet be comfortable. In cases of rheumatoid arthritis, the arch in your foot may become problematic. Buying shoes with arch support will help; it is also a good idea to buy shoes that contour to your foot.

Alleviating Arthritic Pain

Specific exercises may help; stretching the Achilles tendon can prevent further pain and injury. Stretching can also increase your mobility.

For more information about Arthritic Foot Care, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices, located in San Leandro, Pleasanton, and Los Gatos, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all of your foot ankle injuries.


How to Use a Pumice StoneWhether you fancy live music, fine dining, mesmerizing museums, cheap family fun, or a nice relaxing walk or bike ride, there’s always plenty to explore here in the Bay Area. After a long day on your feet—say, walking the beautiful Bay Trail through from Hayward to Marina Park in San Leandro—who can say no to a little at-home spa treatment? A pumice stone may be just what you need, if you’re dealing with unsightly calluses or corns from all that walking about.

It’s a great tool for smoothing and removing dead skin, which not only improves the aesthetics of a weathered foot but can also reduce pain and discomfort in the affected area. Like any tool, though, it can be damaging if used inappropriately.

First, soak your wheels in warm and soapy water for at least five minutes. Once your tootsies are nice and soft, take your stone and gently rub the affected areas for two or three minutes. Circular motion with light pressure is best. You definitely don’t want to be too aggressive here—if you take off too much skin you can wear away your foot’s natural defenses, causing bleeding and inviting infection. You’re not trying to sand off the entire bottom of your foot!

When you’re done, gently pat dry with a soft towel. Don’t rub—your skin is still sensitive. Once dry, massage your foot using a moisturizer. Rinse your pumice stone thoroughly after each use.

Never use a pumice stone on sore, reddened skin, especially if there is an open wound. That’s practically asking for an infection. Furthermore, if you experience numbness or have circulatory issues in your feet, which is common among those with diabetes or neuropathy, you should check with the experts at Foot Doctor of the East Bay first. Decreased sensitivity in your feet can lead to accidental damage and infection without you even realizing it.

For more tips about general foot care—or to schedule an appointment or evaluation for any foot or ankle issues you might be having—call Dr. Michael Stein and Zeindelin Ahmad, DPM of Foot Doctor of the East Bay. You can reach us at one of our three convenient East Bay, CA, locations: San Leandro, (510) 483-3390; Pleasanton, (925) 425-9684; or Los Gatos, (408) 356-6767.

Photo Credit: Salvatore Vuono via FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Stay Active with an Ankle SprainNew York Jets player Dee Milliner suffered a high ankle sprain, ending his season. Milliner will have to contend with four to six weeks on the bench in order to recover. Official details of the diagnosis are yet to be announced; however, the injury’s severe swelling suggests a Grade 2 sprain.

Milliner will not participate in the Jets’ first game of the regular season to ensure full recovery from his injury. Most likely covering for Milliner during this period will be cornerbacks Antonio Allen and Ellis Lankster. “We feel confident that it’s healing nicely,” commented Jets coach Rex Ryan on Milliner’s condition.  

Sprained ankles will typically heal correctly when left alone, but sometimes professional help is needed. If you are seeking assistance with a sprained ankle, see podiatrist Dr. Michael Stein of Foot Doctor of the East Bay. Dr. Steincan attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer all of your related questions.

How Do Ankle Sprains Happen?

Sprain injuries take place when the ligaments are torn or stretched beyond their limits. There are various ways that the ankle can become injured. In fact even the simple act of walking could cause a sprain. Ankle damage can occur by losing footing or walking on uneven terrain.

What are the Symptoms?

  • Mild to moderate bruising
  • Limited mobility
  • Swelling
  • Skin discoloration

How Can I Care for my Ankle at Home?

Self-care for ankle sprains includes propping the ankle up and keeping it elevated, applying ice packs as needed, and remaining off your feet. Some may also find that wrapping the ankle with an ACE bandage and taking over-the-counter pain relievers helps. One of the most important things is avoiding further stress to the affected area.

Preventing Sprains

  • Wearing appropriate shoes
  • Stretching before participating in physical activity
  • Knowing your limitations

Sprain Treatment

Treatment of a sprain depends on its severity.  Many times people are told to rest and remain off their feet while others are given an air cast, which allows you to walk while stabilizing the ankle. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices, located in San Leandro, Pleasanton, and Los Gatos, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all of your foot ankle injuries.




Archive:

Tags

Feetured Article of the Week

Online Store

Foot Doctor of the East Bay Blog Foot Doctor of the East Bay Facebook Foot Doctor of the East Bay Twitter
Foot Doctor of the East Bay Google Plus Foot Doctor of the East Bay YouTube Foot Doctor of the East Bay Pinterest